Crackingstone

Athabasca Northern Saskatchewan

 

High Grade Uranium

Historic 11 tons were shipped from Crackingstone to the Lorado mill grading 2.3% U3O8.

Crackingstone Uranium Project Highlights

  • Situated in the prolific Beaverlodge uranium district on the north shore of Lake Athabasca.
  • History of high grade uranium mineralization – up to 15.6% U3O8.
  • 11 tons @ 2.3% U3O8 previously mined from property.
  • Two prospective mineralized structural/conductive corridors have been defined on the property with each corridor being comprised of multiple electromagnetic (EM) conductors coincident with faults and magnetic lows.
  • 2008 drilling defined a 1,800 m in strike length, near surface uranium mineralized zone associated with pegmatite and hematitic alteration.
  • Drill hole C08-14 intercepted 2.08% U3O8 over 0.3 m and 0.873% U3O8 over 0.5 m within 1.182% U3O8 over 0.9 m from 49.1 to 50.0m.
  • For the first time over 50 years of exploration data compiled into a single database.
  • Upon review of the new exploration database, 4 primary targets were selected for 2024 drilling.
ngstone Uranium Project

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A systematic approach in identifying

high probability uranium drill targets.

1. Faults play a major role in the ore-forming process by providing a conduit for hydrothermal fluids. Most all uranium deposits are closely associated with fault systems. The Crackingstone aeromagnetic survey identified numerous basement structures (faults) trending north – east and east–west, identified as magnetic lows.

2. Graphite Conductors: Airborne EM with follow up Ground VLF-EM survey identified 4 primary structural conductive corridors. EM conductors are potentially indicative of the presence of graphite- and/or sulphide-bearing basement rocks which are associated with all significant uranium deposits in the Athabasca Basin region.

3. Uranium Mineralization: Historic uranium sampling has confirmed the presence of uranium mineralization throughout the property with grades as high as 15.6% U3O8. Most of the surface uranium mineralization is coincident with structural faults and/or EM conductors. Many deposits in the Athabasca Basin have been discovered by drilling on or near similar mineralized conductive graphite-bearing faults.

Crackingstone-Data-Compilation-over-Radiometrics-Uranium

Airborne Radiometric Surveys

A Radiometric survey, or as its also referred to as Gamma ray spectrometry, detect and map natural radioactive emanations called ‘gamma rays’ from rocks and soils. All detectable gamma radiation from earth materials come from the natural decay products of only three elements, uranium, thorium, and potassium. The purpose of radiometric surveys is to determine either the absolute or relative amounts of U, Th., and K in the surface rocks and soils.

The Crackingstone airborne gamma ray spectrometric survey  effectively delineated all known surface U showings/prospects. These and several additional U anomalies appear associated with mapped faults and VLF EM conductive corridors, providing compelling, untested targets for future prospecting and possible drilling in our 2024 Program.

4. Radiometric Survey – Uranium

Crackingstone-Data-Compilation-over-Radiometrics-Uranium

5. Radiometric Survey – Thorium

Crackingstone-Data-Compilation-over-Radiometrics-Thorium

6. Radiometric Survey – Potassium

Crackingstone-Data-Compilation-over-Radiometrics-Potassium

2008 Drill Program

A 2008  20 hole, 3,000 meter diamond drilling program covering an 1,800 meter strike length was carried out. The drilling tested an EM conductor from the Boom Lake – Crackingstone intersection north along the Boom lake fault. All of the drill core was mineralized with uranium along with pegmatite and hematite alteration.

Crackingstone 2008 Drill Area zoom

2008 drilling over Radiometrics – Uranium

Crackingstone 2008 Drill Area over Magnetics 1VD

2008 drilling over Magnetics First Vertical Derivative

In March of 2008 Belmont carried out a 20 hole, 3,000 meter diamond drilling program covering an 1,800 meter strike length from the Boom Lake – Crackingstone intersection north along the Boom lake fault.

All of the drill core was mineralized with uranium.

Some highlights are as follows:

Hole C14:
2.087% U3O8 over 0.3 m and 0.873% U3O8 over 0.5 m
within 1.182% U3O8 over 0.9 m from 49.1 to 50.0 m

DH C14 Drill Core - 1.182% U3O8 over 0.25m

DH C14 Drill Core – 2.08% U3O8 over 0.3 m and 0.873% U3O8 over 0.5 m
within 1.182% U3O8 over 0.9 m from 49.1 to 50.0m

Hole C8:

0.362% U3O8 over 0.15 m from 114.4 to 114.55 metres

within 0.277% U3O8 over 0.25 m from 114.4 to 114.65 m

0.371% U3O8 over 0.5 m starting from 116.2 to 116.7 m;

0.146% U3O8 over 0.35 metres from 123.35 to 123.7 m

Hole C10:

0.256% U3O8 over 0.4 m from 108.5 to 108.9 m

In addition to the uranium mineralization, drilling intercepted a 1.8 kilometer pegmatite dyke. Pegmatite is often associated with uranium mineralization in the Athabasca basin. Of equal importance was the extensive amount of hematite alteration intercepted across the entire 1.8 kilometer zone. Hematite alteration is commonly associated with uranium in the Athabasca basin.  Hematite alteration is an indication of uranium precipitation during the hydrothermal event.

The results of the 2008 drilling were very positive with the interception of uranium mineralization, pegmatites and hematite alteration along the Boom Lake and Crackingstone structural fault zones confirming the methodology of exploring the intersection point of the structural features and the discovery of new zones of mineralization not previously known.

Crackingstone 2008 drill section

2008 drilling identified a new 1.8km mineralized uranium zone.

Pegmatite is often associated with uranium mineralization in the Athabasca basin.

Crackingstone 2008 drilling hematite intercepts

Hematite is an alteration type often associated with uranium and the occurrence of hematite in alteration zones is an indication of uranium precipitation during the hydrothermal event.

The Beaverlodge Uranium District

Athabasca-Mineral-Deposits

The 100% owned Crackingstone property is located in the Beaverlodge uranium district, on the north shore of Lake Athabasca and only 6 km by road from Uranium City, Saskatchewan. A power line crosses the southern portion of the property.

Historic work in the Uranium City area dates back to the 1950’s. From 1953 to 1982, sixteen deposits were brought into production which produced a total of 70,250,000 lbs U3O8 averaging 0.24 % U3O8. The grades ranged from 0.18% to 0.43%.

The Crackingstone property covers 5 kms of the Black Bay Shear Zone, a major structural feature in the region which hosts several past producing mines such as the past producing Leonard and Smitty uranium mines combined to produce 876,000 lbs of uranium oxide and to the northeast the Cayzor uranium mine produced approximately 1,372,800 lbs with unexplored depth potential.

Uranium_City-Geophysics

Structural Faults

On the property and on strike with the Black Bay structural corridor are the northeasterly Chance Lake and Boom Lake Faults. These two faults are on trend with the Leonard, Smitty and Cayzor past producing uranium mines, 6 kilometers north east of the property.

These faults appear to have been reactivated several times to provide ample fractured ground for hosting the uranium mineralization. The easterly Crackingstone fault intersects the two northeasterly faults on the property. The Cinch Lake uranium mine is situated on the Crackingstone fault 6 kilometers east of the property

The two areas of fault intersections are prime locations for potential uranium mineralization. The intersection area of the Boom Lake and Crackingstone faults tested successfully in a 20 hole drilling program in 2008.

EM Conductive Corridors

A 2007 EM survey by Belmont has delineated three primary conductive corridors on the property. The Chance Lake and Boom Lake EM corridors are coincident with the Chance Lake and Boom Lake north easterly faults. The Nero Lake conductive corridor is a broad corridor trending north easterly in the south east area of the property. All three corridors are associated with Uranium occurrences.

Crackingstone Property